Defense beats offense in LU’s 2019 spring game


By Amani Grant-Pate

LU Blue Tigers football (photo by Kenna Lynch)

JEFFERSON CITY -The Marching Musical Storm had Dwight T. Reed Stadium rocking as the 2019 spring game commenced. The Blue team won 43-40 with standout performances from Ja’Juan Chambers and Vontavious Thacker. This was a chance for the Blue Tiger Nation to watch their new team.

The offensive and defensive sides for the Blue Tigers were led by LU’s assistants while head coach Steven Smith oversaw the scrimmage. Coach Smith was proud of his team’s effort and emphasized to them, “We have to be mentally strong to win games.”

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SGA election results

Jordan Smith is the new president of the LU Student Government Association. (Photo by the Clarion News)

By Clarion News

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY – The official 2019-2020 SGA election results released by the LU Office of Communications and Marketing are as follows:

President: Jordan Smith with 64% of the vote.

Vice President: Nicholas Hunt – 51%

Treasurer: Peyton McClellan – 38%

Secretary: Corriana Cox – 40%

Representative at Large (2): Destan Anderson with 37% and De’Mon Fox with 32%.

Campus Activity Board: Nakayla Murff – 54%

Miss Lincoln U is Keianna Hunter with 32% and Mr. Lincoln U is Michael Parks with 57%.

Senior Miss is JeNaye Love-Perkins with 28% and Senior Mister is Kendal Barber with 50%.

Junior Miss is Kenadee Brown with 55.56% and Junior Mister is Malachi Brewer with 20%.

Sophomore Miss is Mya Howard with 43% and Sophomore Mister is Brandon Morris with 98%.

Congratulations to all!

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May commencement returns to Dwight T. Reed Stadium

Clarion News

LU faculty at Dwight T. Reed Stadium during the May commencement exercises, May 2016. (Photo by Will Sites/Clarion News)

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY – President Woolfolk announced on Friday that commencement exercises for the May 2019 graduates will take place at Dwight T. Reed Stadium, returning to a tradition that was replaced in 2017 when graduation was moved to the LINC. Students have been advocating for the switch.

May graduation will take place at 10 a.m. on May 11, 2019. More information coming soon in the Clarion News.

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LU Blue Tiger football spotlight: Hasan Muhammad-Rogers

By Amani Grant-Pate

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY – The Lincoln University football team is back to the grind! Before practice began, I interviewed Hasan Muhammad-Rogers, a junior free safety from Chicago, about the upcoming season. “This spring we have been working focusing on playing mistake-free football and competing at a high level to put together a good season,” said Rogers.

Here’s my video interview with Hasan.

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Ag Club brings fur and feathers to quad

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY – Students enjoyed a beautiful Wednesday on the quad enjoying the annual Ag Club Petting Zoo. Katahdin sheep, shorthorn cattle, and royal palm turkeys were among the four-legged and feathered animals on display. Visitors were encouraged to touch and interact with the non-human participants, many of which are important to Missouri agriculture.

Students enjoying the Ag Club petting zoo on the LU quad. April 10, 2019. (Drone photo by Shawna Scott)
Roy Shurn, an LU sociology major, looks at a Katahdin sheep during the Ag Club petting zoo held April 10, 2019 on the quad. (Photo by Amani Grant-Pate)
Kim Wilbers, a junior ag/animal science major, with royal palm turkeys on display at the Ag Club petting zoo on the quad. April 10, 2019. (Photo by Amani Grant-Pate)
Daniele Ochoa, a sophomore political science major, with a shorthorn calf at the Ag Club petting zoo held Wednesday on the quad. (Photo by Amani Grant-Pate).
Drone aerial of the Ag Club’s petting zoo on the LU quad. April 10, 2019. (Clarion News photo)
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Sell your books May 7-8

Sell your books! (graphic supplied by LU Office of Communication & Marketing)

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY – According to the LU Office of Communication and Marketing, students can sell their non-rental textbooks from 9 a.m. – 5 p.m. on May 7-8, 2019 at Scruggs Student Center.

Make sure to remove all papers, notes, and other material from the books before bringing to Scruggs. The buy-back applies only to non-rental textbooks.

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MDC Holds Event at Capitol

By Cameron M. Gerber


JEFFERSON CITY- The Missouri Department of Conservation (MDC) held its annual event Wednesday in the Capitol rotunda. The goal was to advocate for legislation aiding the department’s current and future preservation plans.

A live bald eagle was a popular part of MDC Day at the Capitol. (Photo by Cameron Gerber)


The day’s event included several displays on the third floor rotunda showcasing the MDC’s efforts throughout the state. Department professionals answered questions on topics such as wild bird rehabilitation and other issues relevant to the public enjoyment of wildlife and the outdoors. A bald eagle was part of a live demonstration of Missouri’s wide array of wildlife.


Conservation bills being considered in the legislature this session cover the department’s budget, taxes, land grants, and rules on animals born in captivity.

MDC Day at the Capitol. (Photo by Cameron Gerber)
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Flooding plagues Missouri River towns

By Will Sites

The Missouri River at moderate flood stage crests at 28 feet in Hermann, Mo. April 1, 2019. (Photo by Will Sites)

HERMANN – Relentless rain and melting snow in the Upper Midwest is bringing the curious to the banks of the Missouri River. In this Gasconade County community known for its deep German heritage and the wine that followed it, the early spring focus is on the rising river that has always been respected, never tamed.

Upstream in the northwest corner of the Show-Me-State, a state of emergency is providing relief to Missouri River communities long under the mighty wrath and current of the Big Muddy. Both town and country have recently been destroyed by this longest river in America. Not thanks to climate change or politics, but by record snowfall and the rains that are melting it. The river’s rise – like many slow-moving natural disasters – is a magnet to locals and not-so-locals alike.

“This is a beautiful river, but it has to be respected,” said Ron Holman, a tourist from Indiana watching the river at Hermann’s riverfront park. “I’ve always been in love with the Missouri (River).” Monday afternoon, he was curious about the river’s future rise-and-fall trend.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) watches and reports the official river gauge, used by tugboats and others making a living on the Missouri. Locals look at long-established landmarks – boat ramps, railroad tracks, parking lots – and generations of experience.

“I wouldn’t worry about it just yet,” said one older man watching the water from the riverfront park. “Not yet.”

On Monday, the folks at NOAA reported the river to be in moderate flood at 28 feet. The river has a few more feet to rise before things get serious. For now, life goes on in Hermann and other communities downstream towards Washington and beyond. The forecast, it seems, calls for sitting by the river, watching the Big Muddy roll on and on and on.

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Car fire blocks Dawson/library traffic

A car became engulfed in flames at about 1 p.m. Monday near Dunklin and Lee streets, blocking traffic to the Dawson Hall and Page Library parking lots. Jefferson City fire and police blocked the scene until about 1:45 p.m.

The car appeared to suffer severe damage. No injuries were reported. (Photo by Ashton Greene/Clarion News)

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Steak ‘n Shake Closes Another Missouri Location

By Clarion News Staff

The Steak ‘n Shake in Sullivan, Mo. sits empty after being added to a growing list of locations shuttered by the corporate owner. March 31, 2019. (Photo by Will Sites)

SULLIVAN, Mo. – Last week’s closing of a Franklin County Steak ‘n Shake adds to a growing list of more than 30 restaurants the chain has shuttered since January due to poor performance and a shift in ownership strategy. About one-third of the closings have occurred in the St. Louis region, including Ballwin, Chesterfield, Ellisville, St. Ann, and Maryland Heights.

According to published news reports, Steak ‘n Shake has about 600 locations, with about 200 being owned by franchisees. The Indianapolis-based company announced last August that it plans to sell the remaining 400 under a franchisor-franchisee agreement. The Sullivan store is corporate-owned and could reopen if a new ownership agreement is reached.

The company says its plan is to sell corporate locations under an agreement similar to other chain restaurants. The idea is to turn Steak ‘n Shake into an owner-manager model, with a local franchisee owning and focusing on only one restaurant. The plan calls for company-owned restaurants to be sold to franchisees for $10,000 each, with profits being split and the property/equipment leased from Steak ‘n Shake.
In a 2018 letter to shareholders, parent corporate owner Sardar Biglari of Biglari Hodlings said recent times have been rough for Steak ‘n Shake. “For the past three years, we have been in decline, with same-store sales below the average for the industry,” wrote Biglari.
The company acknowledges that the current interior kitchen design and management style was unprepared for a significant shift from quick-serve family dining to drive-thru, which now accounts for slightly more than half of all revenue. Future plans include new equipment, quicker drive-thru service, and improved customer relations.
The closed locations will presumably remain inactive until new ownership agreements are reached. Efforts to reach a Steak ‘n Shake spokesperson were unsuccessful.

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LU showcases entrepreneurship at Young Business Expo

By Kaden Quinn

Gwen’s Dollhouse CEO and LU journalism student Tailer Bevly with some of her company’s products. (photo by Kaden Quinn)

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY – On Saturday, March 23, students highlighted their skills as entrepreneurs at the Young Business Expo held in Jason Gym. Both students and alumni attended the event, selling their goods and services and testing their mettle as business owners.

The range of products included clothing, cosmetics, and personal training. The students are serious enough about their products to include unique logos and business cards.

,Whether attending school or already graduated, the entrepreneurs are motivated and ready for the professional marketplace. Not just in the goods they provide, but in bringing a positive message to the world at large. Exhibiting his “New True” clothing line, entrepreneur Brandon Hunter hopes to promote a positive image of self-love for his customers.

“There’s two parts to my business,” Hunter said. “There’s ‘New True’ media and “New True” clothing. The clothing is based on self-love, letting yourself know you’re important, and being true to yourself.” That is what Hunter believes his clothing line is all about – being a new you everyday by learning from past mistakes and being true to who you are.

While others agree with Hunter, some have decided to take a more introspective approach. Professionally known as Renzo Scorsaize, the former Lincoln student set out to creating a clothing line with his brand GUDPPL (good people). After graduation, Scorsaize decided to invest his time into fashion – something he’s always felt passionate about.

Other entrepreneurs at the expo brought their own touches to their businesses. With many already dedicated to beauty services, it was important for each to find their voice. Tailer Bevly spotlighted Gwen’s Dollhouse, a boutique selling clothing and accessories and named in honor of her grandmother, who passed away during Christmas. According to Bevly, it was her grandmother that inspired her to never give up and to always pursue her dreams.

Ultimately the expo was an exercise in what young people could do to contribute to the market in both commerce and positivity. “Get addicted to bettering yourself,” says the expo’s personal trainer Kat Langley. With that in mind, each entrepreneur made sure that they brought their offerings were both inspiring and practical.

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LU comes up short in Quincy doubleheader

LU Sports Information

Lincoln’s Jordan Lawson, a junior from Iberia, Mo., in action against Quincy. March 27, 2019. (Photo courtesy LU Sports Information)

QUINCY, Ill. – The Lincoln softball team notched 14 hits, including three by Jordan Lawson, but Quincy prevailed in a pair of games on Wednesday (March 27). The Hawks won the first game, 10-3, and took the second game, 9-1.

The Blue Tigers struck first in the opener, bringing in three runs in the third inning on three hits. Gabi McGinty and Paige Parker led the frame off with consecutive hits, and an error allowed Lawson to safely get on board and load the bases. That set up Camryn Pryor, who provided the third hit of the inning with a single into center field, bringing home McGinty for a 1-0 Lincoln lead. Rachael Balke drove in Parker with a ground-out in the next at-bat, and another QU error allowed Lawson to score for a 3-0 LU advantage.

Quincy (13-13) answered with a two-out rally in the bottom half of the third, taking the lead with six runs on seven hits. The Blue Tigers had a base runner in each of the next three innings, including two in the sixth, courtesy of base hits by Tori Nienhueser and McGinty, but the Hawks held on for the win.

Bekah Kirker also had two hits for LU in the opener while Lawson had one, and Shannon Greene struck out two Quincy batters in a complete game performance inside the circle. Pryor led the Lincoln defense with seven putouts, and Mykenzie Livesay provided four assists while Kirker and Parker finished with two apiece.

In the second game, Trista Heavin hit her second homerun of the season, as well as her second in the past five days, in the fifth inning to put Lincoln (4-26) on the scoreboard. The Blue Tigers had six hits in the contest, including singles by Lawson and Pryor in the opening inning. Lawson went 2-for-3 at the plate with another base hit in the top of the third.

Livesay and Emily Williams also had hits, and Hannah Hennessy struck out a pair of Hawk batters in the circle. Pryor had four putouts to lead the LU defense while Nienhueser recorded two assists.

The Blue Tigers are scheduled to travel to Maryville, Mo. on Friday (March 29) to play a double-header against Northwest Missouri, with first pitch scheduled for 2:00 p.m. CDT.
 

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Flood warnings issued for local rivers

Malik Henry, Landon Bernskoetter, and Cameron Gerber/Clarion News staff

Remnants of prior flooding along the Moreau River at the U.S. 50 bridge near Walmart in Jefferson City. More flooding is expected this weekend. March 27, 2019. (Photo by Clarion News staff)

JEFFERSON CITY – More rain, more flooding. That’s the gist of a significant late-week rain event that will impact area rivers already swollen from upstream precipitation and melting snow.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) on Tuesday issued numerous flood warnings and advisories for the Missouri River at Jefferson City and the Osage River at the Mari-Osa campground at the U.S. 50 bridge near the Cole-Osage county line.

Prior flooding along the Moreau River at U.S. 50 is expected to rise as precipitation enters the area on Thursday. March 27, 2019. (Photo by Clarion News staff)

The warnings/advisories are based on expected river crests due to upstream action and rain forecasted through the weekend. Many area tributaries – including the Moreau River – may rise near flood stage during the next few days. If the anticipated heavy rains enter the area, the Moreau River may rise by at least 10 feet by Saturday afternoon.

The Missouri River is expected to rise to about 26 feet on Saturday, which is within the moderate flooding stage. Residents and property owners affected by flooding should stay tuned to local weather radio stations and the NOAA website.

The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) is forecasting a 10-foot rise this weekend on the Moreau River near Jefferson City due to a forecast of significant precipitation beginning Thursday, March 28, 2019.

(Drone photos/photography by Malik Henry, Landon Bernskoetter, and Cameron Gerber of the Clarion News staff)

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Donna Brazile speaks at lecture series

By Malik Henry

Donna Brazile signs a book at the LU Presidential Lecture Series event. March 21, 2019. (Photo by Malik Henry)

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY – LU President Dr. Jerald Woolfolk on Thursday was host to the second Presidential Lecture Series event held in the Scruggs University Center Ballroom. The series welcomed a very popular political figure and TV commentator.

Donna Brazile, a well-known political strategist, campaign manager, and author was the featured guest of the night. She spoke about her stint as head of the Democratic National Committee, working on CNN, and her recent decision to become a FOX news contributor. Brazile, a native of Louisiana, is a graduate of Louisiana State University.

Brazile became the first African-American woman to head a presidential campaign when hired by Democrat Al Gore during the 2000 race against George W. Bush – the one decided by the U.S. Supreme Court.

The lecture series are focused on preparing students to reshape the American society as the future leaders of tomorrow by listening and receiving valuable tools from well-known scholars, entertainers, politicians, authors, motivational speakers, and activists. 

Brazile is a firm believer in civic responsibility and education.

“Think about serving on a national level,”said Brazile. “This is your time. Why you? Because there’s no one better. Why now? Because tomorrow’s not soon enough.”

Donna Brazil, center, with LU President Woolfolk, right, at the Presidential Lecture Series event held on the LU campus March 21, 2019. (Photo by Malik Henry)
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Capitol View: Parson touts education, workforce development

By Cameron Gerber

KIRKSVILLE – Gov. Mike Parson on Thursday outlined his plans for a restructuring of the state government during an event held in Kirksville. Parson’s statements echo and expand upon comments made during his State of the State address in January.

Parson has made it his mission to increase efficiency and productivity via a fundamental restructure. He has already made headway on his goals, making changes to the Department of Economic Development as well as to Higher Education.

Parson’s concerns stem from Missouri’s reported lag in economic growth. “We must do a better job clearly identifying expectations and priorities and ensure our agencies are structured in the best ways to meet the goals,” said Parson during his presentation.

Parson has made strides to move agencies around, like moving workforce development operations to join with those of education.

His administration has thus far encouraged trade education and cooperation between schools and local businesses in readying the next generation of the Missouri workforce. He has shown great support for apprenticeships as well as secondary education.

More changes and restructuring expected to follow. Parson is currently in his first legislative session as governor.

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LU Bowling takes 6th at MIAA championship

Dan Carr/LU Sports Information

Dominique Lee

SPRINGFIELD, Mo. – The Lincoln bowling team finished sixth at the MIAA Championship, held at Andy B’s on Saturday (March 23).

Lincoln entered with the sixth seed in the tournament, and faced third-seeded Maryville in the first round. LU fell to the Saints, 751-620.

In the second round of the double-elimination tourney, LU faced Drury, the fourth seed in the tournament. The match was a very closely contested battle, but the Blue Tigers fell in that round by a final score of 873-834. Both matches were Baker play.

The Blue Tigers wrapped up their fourth-ever season of bowling, and for the first time had three athletes make the All-MIAA team. Nina Theroff was a second team selection while Dominique Lee and DiaMone Lewis were each named honorable mention.

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EDITORIAL: Trump’s campus free speech order is misguided

Members of the Westboro Baptist Church protest in front of LU’s Page Library. Aug. 19, 2014. (Clarion News photo)

By Will Sites

“To suppress free speech is a double wrong. It violates the rights of the hearer as well as those of the speaker.” – Frederick Douglass, 1860.

President Trump on Thursday signed an executive order aimed at ensuring free speech on the campuses of public colleges and universities. Offending institutions may face the loss of federal grant funding.

“Under the guise of speech codes, safe spaces and trigger warnings, these universities have tried to restrict free thought, impose total conformity and shut down the voices of great young Americans like those here today,” Trump said at the signing ceremony.

Protecting and promoting free speech has the been the cornerstone of First Amendment rights since its 1791 birth and litigated in many landmark Supreme Court cases, including Gitlow (1925), Tinker (1969), Cohen (1971), and Kuhlmeier (1988). Each one of our journalism students studies the aforementioned cases, especially Tinker and Kuhlmeier, and seems to grasp the realities of speech suppression – on campus and beyond.

The 1971 case Tinker v. Des Moines continues to guide the courts when viewing student rights in public schools. In Tinker, a few students silently protested the Vietnam War by wearing black armbands at school. The students were suspended because the administration feared the armbands would lead to disruption. However, nobody complained – no disruption.

The lower courts concluded that their symbolic speech was not protected. In a 7-2 opinion, the Supreme Court reversed, noting that symbolic speech is protected on public school properties – unless it’s significantly disruptive. The Tinker Test says peaceful religious, political, and symbolic speech must be allowed on public school properties.

The Tinker decision has held for nearly 50 years. Students do not lose their First Amendment rights just because the forum is a public campus. My students seem to be in unison regarding the concept of a university being a home to the marketplace of ideas. Courts have acknowledged that public schools are unique institutions because laws require that we provide access to academics and that we must do so in a safe environment. Seems fair enough.

But courts have also recognized that the “safe environment” must also include polarizing commentary from controversial speakers, campus newspapers, artistic expression, and outspoken professors. In the public forum, there must be no lines drawn to favor one over the other. Equal access. Period.

Trump’s remarks concerning the dangers of “safe spaces” and “trigger warnings” can be linked to recent events up the road at Mizzou, when a now-disgraced (and subsequently removed) university professor advocated the violent removal of media from a public campus event – including a student-reporter. Although the racially charged incident at Mizzou was a pivotal moment for that institution – and certainly led to changes – I don’t see any reason to believe that a charged atmosphere exists at LU.

Trump’s order makes this professor wonder: Do we really need a presidential order concerning free speech on the Lincoln University campus?

Before I answer, it should be duly noted that during my five years at Lincoln University I have confronted the issue surrounding free speech on campus. In 2014, members of the Westboro Baptist Church arrived on campus to spew their hate for soldiers, LGBTQ, and just about every group that we strive to protect.

Cole County deputies guard Westboro Baptist Church protesters near MLK Hall. Aug. 19, 2014. (Clarion News photo)

Just a few yards from my MLK Hall classroom about a dozen sheriff deputies – supported by Jefferson City and LU police – stayed alert protecting the noisy Westboro protestors from local retaliation and the lawsuits it would bring. The so-called Kansas-based church funds its agenda of hate by suing municipalities and others that restrict their speech. My students took photos and reported the scene – a great teaching and learning experience. It was a tense few hours, but in the end nobody from LU tried to stop them. Free speech won the day, not Westboro. That’s an important point.

The problem is that many Americans – young and old – don’t know what “free speech” means, as guaranteed by the First Amendment and defined by the Supreme Court. Journalists and TV commentators frequently say that hate speech is not protected. It is. I rarely hear anyone talk about “fighting words” and the defining court cases (Brandenburg, Cohen, et al.), or public school censorship cases (Kuhlmeier, Morse, etc.). Until we know what we’re talking about, our argumentative GPS will never steer us towards the marketplace of ideas.

In 1957 the U.S. Supreme Court decided a landmark case involving public university professor Paul Sweezy and his lectures concerning Marxism and socialism. Sweezy, under pressure by state investigators and school officials, declined to provide information about his views and classroom material. In a plurality opinion by Chief Justice Earl Warren, the Court held that Sweezy’s lectures may not be politically and academically palatable, but they are protected.  

“The essentiality of freedom in the community of American universities is almost self-evident,” wrote Warren in the Sweezy decision. “Scholarship cannot flourish in an atmosphere of suspicion and distrust. Teachers and students must always remain free to inquire, to study and to evaluate, to gain new maturity and understanding, otherwise our civilization will stagnate and die.”

President Trump, you don’t need to monitor the schoolhouse free-speech gate. We’ll keep it open on our own, thank you.

(Will Sites, assistant professor of journalism at Lincoln University, teaches news reporting and writing, media law, journalism history, public relations, investigative reporting, and drone journalism. He is the adviser to the Clarion News, the oldest HBCU campus newspaper in the U.S.)

LUPD officers near the MLK Hall parking lot. Aug. 19, 2014. (Clarion News photo)
Westboro protesters mix with opposing views near Page Library on the LU campus. Aug. 19, 2014. (Clarion News photo)
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Drone view of frozen Mississippi River

An unusually hard winter along the middle Mississippi River valley creates an interesting opportunity for drone journalism. LU assistant professor of journalism and licensed drone pilot Will Sites flew Blue Tiger 1 over a frozen Mississippi River at Grafton, Illinois – just upstream from St. Louis.

(Sites teaches drone journalism at Lincoln University in Jefferson City, Mo.)

A tugboat pushes a barge full of coal near Grafton, Illinois.
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Administration Spotlight: Dr. Marcus Chanay

By Kay Gordon


Dr. Marcus Chanay

By Kay Gordon

LINCOLN UNIVERSITY-The university has welcomed a lot of new administration this school year, including Vice President of Student Affairs Dr. Marcus Chanay.
Chanay started his career in higher education in 2001 at Jackson State University as a specialist in program development. In 2004, he became the dean of the Division of Student Life. In 2008, Chanay served as the vice president for Student Life and as an assistant professor of higher education. He held that position until 2014. Chanay then moved to Hawkins, Texas for his most recent position as vice president for Student Affairs at Jarvis Christian College.
The roles that Chanay has held in leadership also align with Lincoln’s vision to serve as a university believing in diversity and embracing the learning environment. He has led initiatives that cater to a diverse student body, which includes the Jackson State University Veteran’s Center, which helped veteran students, active military students, and their families.
As a college student, Chanay never thought that he would end up working in higher education. He attended the University of Arkansas at Pine Bluff (UAPB), where he was originally a pre-med major before switching to broadcast journalism.
“The following semester I was put into an Intro to Mass Communications class,” said Chanay during a recent interview. That’s when he developed a love for journalism. While attending UAPB, Chanay learned to do commercials, work the switchboard, and many other things.
At UAPB, Chanay put together four professional sports shows and worked on his portfolio, which led to an internship and work at ESPN. Although he gained a lot of experience at the sports network, it led him down a different career path.
“During that time I realized broadcasting wasn’t something that I wanted to do,” Chanay said, “It’s a dog-eat-dog world.”
He began taking education courses as a backup plan while also doing radio and play-by-play recaps of the football team. He eventually started teaching at a local high school. What Chanay appreciated most about his time at UAPB was the hands-on experience and the options the school offered for journalism students.
“We had a mass communication club, a weekly newspaper, and yearbook. Students could be involved with one, if not all three,” said Chanay.
Chanay has a B.A. in Mass Communications with minors in education and business, a Master’s in Education Administration, and a Ph.D. in Urban Education.
Chanay officially started his position at Lincoln University on July 1, 2018.  

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Alumni Spotlight: Blake Ralling

Richard "Blake" Ralling shoots for the LU Blue Tigers (photo courtesy LU Sports Information)

By Kay Gordon

NEW YORK – In 2014 Blake Ralling transferred from Mississippi Valley State to Lincoln University, with the intention of playing basketball and pursuing a degree in broadcast journalism. Over the next year, the Atlanta native achieved both, graduating with honors. Soon after, Ralling moved to Europe, where he played basketball for one season in Cambrai, France, just two hours north of Paris. After playing basketball, he became a coach and trainer.

Ralling’s interest in journalism stems from his love of playing basketball and just sports in general. He knew what it was like to be a player, but he wanted to experience the professional and reporting side of the sports world. Academically and professionally, Ralling wanted more.

He applied to graduate school and is now in New York, attending the prestigious Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism for his master’s degree. Although it has been a few years since he has been in a classroom, Ralling says his appreciation for journalism has grown.

“I have a better understanding for the art of journalism,” says Ralling. “Being in the era of Trump, you have to be smart in how you deliver messages and your message has to be 100 percent accurate. With Trump running rampant with the fake news movement, journalists must be able to convey a clear and concise delivery and message.”

Ralling gives some sound advice about getting into the journalism field and applying for grad school. “The field of journalism is tough to enter and applying for grad school can be tough as well,” Ralling says. “But you must be relentless when it comes to both – always follow-up, apply yourself, and watch the news.”

He says that a great journalist always knows what’s going on and that it’s important to be relentless and aggressive.

“Don’t be nervous – be open and optimistic.”

(A sample of Ralling’s graduate school video work is below)

Congestion Pricing Hits New York City
https://vimeo.com/315805292

Sweet Chick Restaurant Helps Furloughed Workers
https://vimeo.com/315806248

NYCHA’s Drew-Hamilton Houses Suffer Without Hot Water
https://vimeo.com/304482452

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Court upholds Sunshine Law violation

Missouri Sunshine Law (Clarion News Graphic)

By Landon Bernskoetter/March 21, 2019

JEFFERSON CITY – Cole County Circuit Judge Pat Joyce’s October 2017 decision that former Cole County prosecutor Mark Richardson “knowingly and purposefully violated the Sunshine Law” was upheld recently by the Missouri Court of Appeals in Kansas City. Joyce ordered Richardson to pay a total of $36,170 to Aaron Malin, the plaintiff in the 2015 lawsuit.

Malin, a researcher for Show-Me Cannabis, was denied open-record information by the Cole County prosecutor’s office. Richardson was defeated during the last year’s August primary.

The violation of the Sunshine Law was a point of contention in the most recent round of prosecuting attorney elections. Locke Thompson succeeded Richardson as prosecutor on Jan. 1, 2019. In a statement to the Jefferson City News Tribune, he said “I obviously made a point during the election that I thought Mark violated the Sunshine Law in this case, and the Western District made it clear with their ruling.”

When asked his perspective, Malin told the News Tribune “It’s really important that government agencies are held accountable, especially law enforcement agencies and prosecutors’ offices. If they don’t comply with the Sunshine Law, they should be taken to court. Hopefully this is a deterrent so other agencies will be warned and see that this law will be enforced.”

Malin’s case is based on a time period when Malin made Sunshine Law requests to Richardson’s office. The appeals court found that “On each occasion, (Richardson) responded with general objections to the records requests, sometimes untimely, and indicated that the request was too burdensome and the task of searching for any responsive documents simply would not be performed; further, (Richardson) stated his conclusions without confirming or denying the existence of the records you requested.”

Failure to comply resulted in Richardson receiving a $12,100 fine and paying Malin’s attorney fees.

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LU takes first at William Jewell

Dan Carr/LU Sports Information

LIBERTY, Mo. – The Lincoln men’s outdoor track & field team won seven events and scored 119 points to take first place at the Darrel Gourley Open, hosted by William Jewell College on Saturday (April 13).

Mohamed Kouyate won the 400m with a time of 48.41, and joined with Tyrese Halls, Raymone Campbell and Coy Spence to take the 4x400m relay in 3:16.46. Halls placed third in the 400m, timing in at 48.84, and Ouekie Wright (50.77) and Yardley Pierre-Louis (51.29) respectively finished sixth and seventh.

Kizan David won the triple jump with a mark of 14.69m, and Ryan Brown was the victor in the long jump with a leap of 7.46m. In the latter event, David placed third at 7.13m.

Javan Gray (10.40), Campbell (10.44) and David (10.64) swept the top-three in the 100m, and Spence won the 400m hurdles after clocking in at 53.91. Damaine Dixon finished second in that event with a time of 54.25, and Gawayne Porter (59.01) placed sixth while Abubakar Mohammed (59.46) came in seventh.

Lincoln also had success in the 110m hurdles, with Brown winning the preliminary race in 14.57, followed by Spence in third at 14.85. In the finals, Souleyman Seck claimed fourth after timing in at 15.32, and Mohammed checked in at fifth with a time of 15.52.

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